exploring Kristiansund for Christmas

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I am writing this from our place, after having spent 22nd to 27th in Kristiansund, with my friends Aleksandra and Rebecca’s family- I got to meet their sweet mum and grandma, two brothers called Marcus, Mariam with Bunturabi and Habib. SO enjoyed meeting them and spending Christmas with them!

As we all anticipate the new year in a few hours, it was definitely a great way to spend Christmas, despite missing my mum, Tasha, Arthur and cousins this Christmas. I am glad I got to experience a Norwegian Christmas. Here are 5 Norwegian Christmas traditions I have enjoyed experiencing:

  • Decorating the Christmas tree and home: the lighting from all the homes here makes walking out in the evenings feel so much warmer. Ornaments like heart-shaped Christmas baskets, filled with goodies, paper chains, and Norwegian flags. Families also make a lot of cookies and pepperkakehus, or gingerbread houses.
  • Lighting candles:besides the advent, where candles are lit on the first Sunday, I love the overall use of so many candles to light up homes and make them more cozy.
  • Eating traditional Scandinavian food: I got to enjoy Risengrynsgrøt, a Norwegian rice porridge usually prepared for lunch on Christmas day, served with sugar and cinnamon and a dab of butter in the centre. An almond is hidden in the pot, and the lucky person that finds it in their bowl receives a gift (Mariam was the well deserved winner) I also got to enjoy Ribbe or pork ribs, and Pinnekjøt, served with mashed potatoes. Oh, Risengrynsgrøt is chilled and served as dessert, with syrup as a pudding…
  • Watch the East German film, Three Gifts For Cinderella: Since 1975, NRK shows Three Gifts for Cinderella every Christmas Eve. Similar to Dinner for One, it has become a holiday classic in Norway. The movie is based on Bozena Nemcova’s version of the tale of Cinderella, with a feminist approach. The film was originally released in Czech and German, but NRK broadcasts it in one male Norwegian-voice over for all the characters which i found interesting.
  • Visiting friends and family: Both friends and family are hosted either on Christmas day or after, share a meal and enjoy each others company- this is reminds me of home!

What are some Christmas traditions you and your family per-take? I know whatever the tradition, the most important part for me is to spend it with those i love 🙂 I look forward to taking stock in December.

Happy holidays,

Karen